13 years ago
Clint Rohr

On St. Patrick’s Day evening, my roommates and I threw a memorable (and noticeable) party from our Phase 8 apartment balcony. Many residents – some curious, others irritated – came out to see what was occurring. Forty minutes passed before three UTD police arrived. Obviously, this “event” was sanctioned by neither UTD nor Waterview, so I was ordered to turn off the music.


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On Sunday afternoon, a Volley-Q tournament was sponsored by Waterview. For this event, a DJ from a UTD fraternity was asked, and sanctioned, to play music. The music he played was uncensored rap with vulgar and crude lyrics, demeaning attitudes toward women, and promotion of illegal drug use.

Editor, I see a problem that a sanctioned Waterview DJ can play this music, while I, an unsanctioned DJ, yet playing clean music, need to be shut down. I am not offended by rap music, but this particular sequence of events certainly raised my eyebrow.

Lisa Garza, of Student Life, said that she was at the Volley-Q event and that even she herself was worried about the music. My letter to you, Editor, begins concern, but I will end with a commendation of Lisa Garza and the way she handled this concern. She was helpful and professional. She reiterated Waterview’s policy on loud music, and that it does need to be officially sanctioned, but also she also said she would consider in the future the type music that would be played.