Josanne Howard

Changing perspectives and world views, the Fulbright Scholars Program offers professors the opportunity to teach abroad. This program creates an understanding of different cultures.

According to the official website, Senator Fulbright proposed this program as “a much-needed vehicle for promoting mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of the world.”

Fulbright’s proposal was accepted in 1945 and the Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES) began exchanging professors and students around the world.

“William Fulbright set up this program for the U.S. state department in order for people around the world to study and teach here in the U.S. and vice-versa,” said Marie Chevrier, assistant professor of politics and economy and Fulbright Scholar.

This year, Chevrier will teach “International Negotiation” at a university in India for six months.

“I’m going to a country that fought many wars and is considered to be one of the most volatile countries in the world,” Chevrier said. “They live daily with tension so I can learn something new to teach my students in conflict resolution.”

The Fulbright Scholars Program, along with the universities across the world, supports the professors and their families while they are in another country.

“My children can go with me so they can learn a lot about a new culture,” Chevrier said.

To become a Fulbright Scholar, one has to have a PhD, currently be a U.S. citizen and be proficient in another language. After completing one team and using a grant, one must wait three years before applying to be a Fulbright Scholar again.

In 1994, Sheila Amin Gutierrez de Pineres was awarded a grant and became a Fulbright Scholar. Her proficiency in Spanish allowed her to teach in Colombia for four months.

“I headed a seminar in Advanced Macro-economy Theory in Spanish for faculty,” said Sheila Amin Gutierrez de Pineres, associate dean for undergraduate education.

Pineres plans to reapply for a grant in 2005-2006 to teach in Spain.